The Massorite sect of Talmidaism

 

Massorites value ancient tradition and ritual, and follow a modernised form of Galilean custom. Massorite meshartim (ministers) wear traditional clothing in services, and at festivals Massorites make traditional food based on ancient recipes.

 

The term should not to be confused with Massoretes, who are the editors of the text of the Hebrew bible; or with Masorti, who are the conservative Jews of Israel. All three terms are however derived from the same Hebrew word – masóret, which means ‘tradition’.

 

The outlook of Massorites is relatively moderate and flexible. They are not fundamentalist or even conservative. They take a scholarly, moderate view of biblical interpretation, realising that spiritual truth is not always the same as historical truth. They also accept that not all Followers of the Way are called to be Massorite, believing that each tradition within Talmidaism has its place and its own role to play in the life of the Talmidi community.

The ethos of Massorite spirituality is humility and compassion, and gentleness of spirit. A Massorite appreciates ancient style, customs and traditions, preserving what is best and meaningful, and modernising what is not transferable to modern life. Massorite prayers are very much in the ancient Hebrew style of poetry, Massorite music is very Middle Eastern, and Massorite social custom tries to reflect that of ancient Israelites.

 

The theory behind all this is that, in recreating as much as possible the culture of ancient Israel, a Massorite Talmidi will eventually be able to automatically understand the imagery and reasoning behind Hebrew scripture. The Torah & The Prophets were written with a specific culture behind it, and without understanding that culture, one cannot fully appreciate the Scriptures.

To learn more about Massorite Talmidaism, please go to our contact page and either write to us ('The Association for Massorite Talmidaism', c/o The World Fellowship of Followers of the Way) or email us .



   
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